Friday, 23 May 2014

How hot is hot?

How hot is hot?


The pungency or heat of a pepper depends on seven closely related alkaloids or capsaicinoids. In the early 1900s, Wilbur L. Scoville devised a test to determine the relative hotness of different peppers. 

Capsaicin from a known weight of pepper was extracted with alcohol and mixed in various concentrations with sweetened water. Human tasters were asked to identify the point at which water neutralized the hotness. 

The volume of water required for each sample was assigned a rating in Scoville units—the larger the number, the more water needed and the hotter the pepper. A high-pressure liquid chromatography test replaced this technique in the early 1980s, but the measurements are still expressed in Scoville units. 

The following peppers are listed from most hot to least hot, according to Scoville units.

Habanero
  • Caribbean Red_______________________100,000–445,000
  • Red _______________________________80,000–285,000
  • Scotch Bonnet________________________80,000–260,000

Jamaican Hot_________________________100,000–200,000
Chiltepini______________________________50,000–100,000
Santaka
Thai
Cayenne_______________________________50,000–70,000
Charleston Hot
Piquin_________________________________30,000–50,000
Aji
Cayenne
Tabasco
Thai Dragon____________________________35,000–45,000
De Arbol_______________________________15,000–30,000
Serrano_________________________________5,000–23,000
Yellow Wax______________________________5,000–15,000
JalapeƱo_________________________________2,500–5,000
Mirasol
Cascabel_________________________________1,500–2,500
Rocotillo
Sandia
Ancho___________________________________1,000–1,500
Chilaca
Espanola
Pasilla
Poblano
Anaheim___________________________________500-1,000
Big Jim
New Mexico
Cherry______________________________________100–500
Mexi-Bell
Peperoncini
Bell________________________________________________ 0
False Alarm
Pimento
Sweet Banana
Sweet Italian

How hot is hot?

ShareThis